Harlington

Showing comments and forms 1 to 21 of 21

Object

Site Assessment Forms (Housing)

Representation ID: 135

Received: 06/07/2017

Respondent: Mrs Christine Rands

Representation:

ALP181 is totally unsuited for the area on grounds of traffic, flooding, water, wildlife & green belt

Full text:

Proposed Housing Site - Harlington reference ALP181/NLP107
We have studied your list of draft sites for development in Central Bedfordshire and would like to comment on the above suggested site. We do not believe that any further development on the South side of Harlington is appropriate for the following reasons :
Transport - the development suggests around 200 housing units. This would produce at least 300 extra cars to be accommodated on this site. The resulting additional weekly journeys would be measured in their thousands when taking into account delivery vehicles and commuting. All traffic entering or leaving the site would have to come either over Sundon Hill or down from the crossroads using Sundon Road. This road is already heavily congested at times. These narrow roads are not suited to take this increased volume of traffic particularly with the steep hill and dangerous bends. The effect would be even worse during the construction phase (5-10 years), with heavy plant/materials to be delivered plus the parking congestion caused by the tradespersons' vehicles.
Flooding - the land in this area is very low and has been subjected to flooding in the past. The gardens on the South side of Pilgrims Close continue to flood in times of heavy rain. The concreting of the fields would undoubtedly make this situation much more serious.
Water - conversely, water supply pressure has been an issue in this area together with sewage problems.
Wildlife - the area supports all sorts of wildlife. The magnificent hedgerows that run roughly North to South behind Pilgrims Close are teaming with wildlife. These hedgerows were established more than 40 years ago and it is inconceivable that these could be protected with such a development. Apart from the common birds, Woodpeckers, Barn Owls and Hawks are seen in these fields. On hot summer evenings Bats are seen feeding and butterflies appear to be on the increase over recent years.
Green Belt - the area is in the Green Belt and adjacent to an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty.
We feel strongly that Harlington should retain its position as a village and we also feel that it has reached its limit. For example the schools are close to capacity and obtaining a doctor's appointment has become difficult. However, we are conscious too that additional housing has to be found. In this context if additional building is going to be forced on the village it seems to us that the only sensible solution is to build to the West of the railway or to the North of the village. If this were the case the enormous increase in traffic could be encouraged to enter or leave via the A5120/M1.

Object

Site Assessment Forms (Housing)

Representation ID: 233

Received: 19/07/2017

Respondent: Mr Clive Edward Hall

Representation:

The proposed development would:
(1) be within the Green Belt near to the Chilterns AONB
(2) undermine the Government's principles of sustainable development
(3) contravene CBC's Core Strategy
(4) exacerbate existing traffic congestion
(5) adversely affect road safety
(6) have an unsustainable impact on wildlife and biodiversity
(7) adversely affect the enjoyment of the countryside
(8) result in flooding of properties in Pilgrims Close and Park Leys
(9) exacerbate problems with water pressure and sewerage
(10) exceed the capacity of the schools in Harlington
(11) exceed the capacity of the doctors' surgery
(12) increase light, noise and traffic pollution.

Full text:

ALP181/NLP107
Having examined your list of proposed sites for Housing Development, we wish to register our Objection to the above Proposal on the following grounds:
(1) This site is within the Green Belt near to the Chilterns AONB and should be preserved as such in accordance with the Government's Planning Policy Guidance and Statements.
(2) The proposed development would undermine the Government's principles of sustainable development contained in its Planning Policy Statement 1.
(3) It is contrary to Central Bedfordshire Council's Core Strategy
(4) The proposed development would exacerbate existing traffic congestion problems.
Sundon Road is narrow, winding and lacking in pavements in places. Frequent hold-ups occur south of the cross-roads and residents' and commuters' vehicles have been damaged. This situation was made slightly worse by the recent building of Kent Court, Chapel Close and Hillside Close, vehicular access to which sometimes adds to the congestion.
(5) Road safety for both vehicles and pedestrians would be adversely affected.
There have been a number of collisions and also one fatality in Sundon Road in recent years.
(6) It would also have a significant and unsustainable impact on the wildlife and biodiversity of the area.
The field and hedgerows provide a habitat for a wide variety of birds and animals including some specially protected species, namely barn owls, bats and badgers.
(7) The proposed development would have an adverse effect on the enjoyment of the countryside by walkers.
The field is crossed by two public footpaths which are used by dog walkers on a daily basis.
(8) It would result in the flooding of the properties in Pilgrims Close and Park Leys, following heavy rainfall.
Despite the flood alleviation works carried out by Mid Bedfordshire District Council in 2008 following the serious flooding in 2003, the rear gardens of the properties in Pilgrims Close continue to flood following heavy rainfall. This situation would almost undoubtedly become worse if the field behind the properties was built on. The properties in Pilgrims Close are not connected to surface water drainage and rely upon soakaways, which at times are overwhelmed when the land becomes saturated.
(9) The water and sewerage systems would be unable to cope with such development.
There have been problems with water pressure recently and also with the sewerage system in the past. Following heavy rainfall, raw sewage has risen up from the foul water sewers and flooded gardens in the lower lying properties in Pilgrims Close and Park Leys. Existing systems would not stand more properties being connected.
(10) The schools in the village have already reached full capacity and would be unable to cope with the likely increase in pupil numbers.
This applies to both the Lower and Upper Schools in the village.
(11) The doctors' surgery, which is already under pressure, would be unable to provide a satisfactory medical service for the increased patient numbers.
There are already long waiting times to obtain appointments to see the doctors.
(12) The proposed development would result in increased light, noise and traffic pollution.
These harmful effects would be detrimental to residents' health and quality of life.

Object

Site Assessment Forms (Housing)

Representation ID: 422

Received: 03/08/2017

Respondent: Mrs H Jackson

Representation:

Object to the use of countryside for housing.
If necessary building should be to the west of railway line so traffic can use A5120/M1

Full text:

See attached letter

Attachments:

Object

Site Assessment Forms (Housing)

Representation ID: 425

Received: 03/08/2017

Respondent: Mr John Millard

Representation:

Object to ALP181
In Green Belt and close to Chilterns AONB
History of flooding- assessment of drainage and risk of flooding is essential.
Site supports variety of wildlife
Harlington Lower School and doctors surgery are full

Full text:

See attached letter

Attachments:

Comment

Site Assessment Forms (Housing)

Representation ID: 1187

Received: 18/08/2017

Respondent: Scott Properties

Representation:

Concerns re: GB assessments and function of GB land
Promoting suitability of NLP379
Site clearly and demonstrably complies with CBC's own exceptional circumstances test, and that it is a site that accords entirely with a stated strategy revolving around village expansion close to public transport nodes; there can be no argument that it is a site that should be allocated for residential development in the emerging Local Plan.
See attached for detailed letters on suitability of NLP379 and issues raised with the plan

Full text:

See attachment

Attachments:

Comment

Site Assessment Forms (Housing)

Representation ID: 1366

Received: 20/08/2017

Respondent: Mr David Blakeman

Representation:

Site assessments fail to consider the issues of settlement coalescence adequately, or at all.
Site assessments contain numerous glaring inaccuracies.

Full text:

I am strongly objecting.
The attached case studies contain clear errors in methodology and conclusions. In particular, the case studies state, in answer to question 7 of the site assessments, that there are "no coalescence issues". This response is clearly inaccurate in the case of sites ALP117 and NLP381 and is, at best, misleading and, at worst, inaccurate, so far as concerns the other sites selected to move forwards as part of the plan process.
Sites NLP381 and ALP117 are very large sites. They stand to the west of the railway line and breach the protective line that the line creates in terms of creating unsustainable "orphan" development to the west of the existing settlement. In terms of coalescence, it clearly creates ribbon development running from the western end of the proposed site, (which abuts the roundabout on Harlington Road (at the junction with the A5120)) , past Poplars Garden Centre, and the M1 junction which abiuts Poplars. To state more simply, there would be development running from the M1 junction all the way up to Harlington. The existing green wedge, dividing Harlington from the development commencing at the A5120 roundabout would be eliminating, thus causing coalescence with the developed area running from the M1 junction. Furthermore, the proposed developments leave only a very small wedge of land dividing Harlington from Westoning.
Even worse, however, the colossal scale of development (doubling or even trebling the existing population of the village) that would result were the various non-excluded sites also to be developed would destroy the character of the village and would completely overwhelm the services available in the village (the site assessments fail to identify the services accurately-but which merely consist of a corner shop, a small cafe, a hairdressers and a gunsmith!).

In short, simply on coalescence issues, the site assessments fail in terms of methodology and conclusion. There are many other concerns, alluded to, obliquely, in this comment (but including also unnecessary elimination of the green belt, transport, sustainablilty andndrainage ssues), that are of major concern, but coalescence is an obvious issue that has clearly not been dealt with properly.

Object

Site Assessment Forms (Housing)

Representation ID: 1383

Received: 20/08/2017

Respondent: Andrew Gerrie

Representation:

Village Infrastructure cannot cope with the extra cars and there is no scope to improve it
School is oversubscribed and it would create bitter competition
Access MUST be via Sundon road, Pilgrims close could absolutely not cope with the increased traffic levels.
ALP117/ NLP381 is a far better prospect than ALP 181/NLP 107
With the information currently available, I would not object to ALP117/ NLP381.

Full text:

ALP 181/NLP 107

This development will have a dramatic impact on the traffic flows on the villages or Harlington itself and Upper Sundon.
the only access out of the village is either North through the village to the crossroads or further south, up the Sundon hill to Upper Sundon. Both routes out of the village have eventual access to the M1 so will be popular routes but neither are geared up to cope with a few hundred extra cars using them on a daily basis. At peak times, the crossroads in the village queues up considerably and given the size of the roads and how close existing buildings, including Harlington Manor are to the road, there is no scope to improve the junction.
If the development were to be built, there is absolutely no question that the only vehicular access would need to be via Sundon road ONLY. The Park Leys estate and Pilgrims close would not be able to cope with traffic on this scale, and this would have a fundamental impact on the way of life of residents in the estate and would result in significant health and safety issues.
Places at the lower school are full every school year. The school would require significant development but the site isn't quite large enough to warrant building an entirely new school, so instead the development would cause bitter levels of competition between existing and newer residents.

The ALP117/ NLP381 development on the West side of the village looks like a much better prospect for the following reasons:
Train line as a natural boundary, but still various access points meaning there would be far fewer objections from residents
Direct, fast access to the M1 at Junction 12 without the need to drive through any villages
Larger to warrant either the inclusion of a new school
Greater scope for future development

Comment

Site Assessment Forms (Housing)

Representation ID: 2198

Received: 25/08/2017

Respondent: Rosemary Cockfield

Representation:

ALP117/ALP123/ALP181/NLP107/NLP303/NLP381 All sites assessed to be considered further in Harlington are in Green Belt. I believe all other options should be considered before Green Belt. However, to quote from section 9 of Draft Local Plan, if "exceptional circumstances" "justify the limited release of some Green Belt land" then no more than one of these sites in Harlington should be considered. Also Site ALP117 has over 50% of Grade 2 Agricultural land. Re sections 26/27 of Assessment note that Harlington has only one convenience store and bus service is not hourly.

Full text:

ALP117/ALP123/ALP181/NLP107/NLP303/NLP381 All sites assessed to be considered further in Harlington are in Green Belt. I believe all other options should be considered before Green Belt. However, to quote from section 9 of Draft Local Plan, if "exceptional circumstances" "justify the limited release of some Green Belt land" then no more than one of these sites in Harlington should be considered. Also Site ALP117 has over 50% of Grade 2 Agricultural land which I think should be retained for agriculture. Re section 26 of Assessment, Harlington has only one convenience store. Section 27 Bus service is not hourly.

Object

Site Assessment Forms (Housing)

Representation ID: 2205

Received: 25/08/2017

Respondent: Rosemary Cockfield

Representation:

ALP117/ALP123/ALP181/NLP107/NLP303/NLP381 All the sites which have been assessed to be considered further in Harlington are in Green Belt. I object to development on Green Belt in principle and think that all other options for housing should be considered first.

Full text:

ALP117/ALP123/ALP181/NLP107/NLP303/NLP381 All the sites which have been assessed to be considered further in Harlington are in Green Belt. I object to development on Green Belt in principle and think that all other options for housing should be considered first.

Object

Site Assessment Forms (Housing)

Representation ID: 2691

Received: 28/08/2017

Respondent: Mr & Mrs Caldwell

Representation:

Inappropriate development in the green belt

Inadequate infrastructure, particularly education provision and local road network

Extensive further technical investigations required.

Full text:

NLP 107 - Land West of Sundon Road Harlington

Objection to proposed residential development.

1.0 Site NLP 107/ALP181
The site, in the Green belt, is located at the southern end of the village and forms part of the field network which extends into the Chilterns AOB. The site itself, from the railway to the west and Sundon Road to the east, consists of three individual Grade 3 agricultural fields which have been used in recent years for the grazing of cattle and the provision of arable crops. Part of the field adjacent to the railway was 'out of action' for a period of approximately 2 years whilst an additional track was added to the railway line to allow an improved service for heavy goods trains. During the works the well-used footpath network transferred to adjacent to the hedge rather than across the field and to allow further access the owner was required to remove an unauthorised stile which remained following the railway works. The footpaths are well used both by locals and visitors to the village with its clearly signed routes. The site makes a positive role in providing access to the open countryside and retains the valuable landscape, the hedgerows being well established with a wide variety of flora and fauna including nesting birds and foxes.

2.0 Green Belt
The Central Bedfordshire and Luton Green Belt study, accepts (paragraph 3.10) that National Planning Policy and guidance provides limited material on how the five purposes of the Green belt should be interpreted. Stage 1 of the study relating to the area H2 rates this larger area as making a strong contribution to assisting in the safeguarding of the countryside from encroachment with the site NLP107 'likely' to have a weaker relationship with the countryside.
I am not persuaded that the built edge of a development established more than 40 years ago has had such an 'urbanising influence' as set out in stage 2 to reduce the openness of the green belt in this location given the existing rural characteristics of the proposed site and its relationship with the existing development. I would refer to paragraph 3.12 of the Central Bedfordshire and Luton Green Belt study and the detailed reference to openness. The development in Pilgrims Close backing onto the site is of low density with detached houses and reasonable sized gardens. The gardens have matured over the years and trees and planting restricts some of the view of the properties. In addition to which it should be pointed out at this stage that at the back of the houses from number 19 - 33 the ditch was originally in a culvert within the property boundaries (thus restricting some boundary treatment). Following a flooding incident in 2000 which affected these properties the water authority/ council installed a separate ditch along its length within the field but the culvert remains.
The fields concerned may be of smaller size to the adjoining area to the south but the form and landscape provide a visual enclosure and transition between the present edge of the village in this location and the larger fields. I consider that the site to be part of the countryside and makes a valuable contribution to the wider Green belt. No special circumstances have been presented to make an exception to the green belt policy and allow development.
I would request that further consideration be given to retaining the green belt boundary to the south of the village in its present location.


3.0 Site assessment

In addition to my objection in principle to the proposed site being allocated for residential development I would raise objection and comment on the impact of the proposed development on the present infrastructure of the village and surroundings.
The methodology used by CBC has the number of proposed dwellings for the site to be 115 with access onto Sundon Road.
This in itself raises concerns, for if development of this number was to proceed, how would the important natural features be retained on the site in a satisfactory manner, given the limited protection in planning terms to hedges and more importantly, the overall impact a development of this size would have on the adjacent green belt and the Chilterns AOB.

4.0 Transport issues
Potentially there could be an additional 250 vehicles from this development giving an increased demand for travel plus those vehicles servicing the development.
Sundon Road being the north- south main route from the village cross roads. The cross roads is a 'hot spot' in the village given its restricted visibility and limited possibility of improvement given its location surrounded by listed buildings and land outside the direct control of the Council. An inspection at any time of the day will reveal the constant 'near accidents' which occur at this junction. This is also an east - west route between the M1 and Barton, Hitchin and beyond. At the southern end of Sundon Road at the exit to the village is a double bend with further bends beyond which have claimed casualties over recent years. A further increase in traffic movements, as this is also used as a way into Luton, would exacerbate an unsatisfactory and at times dangerous situation and give rise to localised congestion. Should further development at the north end of the village be allowed this would further increase the traffic flow.
Within the village, on street parking serving the properties on the west side (and rail commuters) is a constant thus only allowing a single flow of traffic in either direction and many hold-ups particularly at peak periods.
A bend in the road opposite the Chapel and again another in close proximity to the Old Sun PH are dangerous hazards.
It is acknowledged that the station provides a sustainable form of transport and together with other facilities has 'elevated' Harlington to a 'minor service centre'. However, with the increase usage of the station has come an increase in cars from out of village locations and parking pressure on the nearby roads for the station car park is at capacity. It would appear there is no more land available to increase the car parking. With the proposed additional development both in the village and in the surrounding area this will increase the problem and have an effect on the character and residential amenity of the village.
There is a very limited bus service and does not provide a sustainable alternative to the use of the car.

5.0 Surface water flooding
As mentioned earlier in my representation there is a history of surface water flooding coming from the site NLP107. Several properties have been refused insurance as a result of the need for the additional works and existence of a ditch in close proximity to the houses. There is a constant concern along Pilgrims Close that as the fields do hold water during the year that the situation could occur again and there is further history of flooding in the estate. Reinforcement work to the culvert and the drains at the entrance to the field adjacent to no.19 took place last year. Surface water flooding would require further investigation.

6.0 Railway to the west
The number of tracks has been increased giving rise to additional noise and disturbance given the nature of the transport using the additional line. This is a permanent feature. Mitigation measures would need to be included and further investigation required.

7.0 Education facilities
Whilst contributions would be required from developers of any of the sites within Area A towards education nevertheless, given the restricted nature of the existing site and the lack of land to expand at Parkfields Middle school, a new site would be required. Where would school pupils of this age attend? Until the school provision at all levels is resolved both in the short and long term I would object to any further development in Harlington and the immediate area.

In summary, my objections to the development :-
There are no exceptional circumstances to allow the site NLP107 in the Draft Local plan to be developed and as such would be inappropriate development in the green belt.
The existing infrastructure, particularly the education provision and the local road network is inadequate to accommodate the proposed development.
Extensive further technical investigation would need to be undertaken to establish the suitability of developing the site.

Object

Site Assessment Forms (Housing)

Representation ID: 3631

Received: 29/08/2017

Respondent: Mr K Fine

Agent: DLA Town Planning Ltd

Representation:

Site NLP470 is a highly suitable site for residential development. It would form a sensible extension to the village of Harlington, is bounded on two sides by Harlington Upper School, would be of an appropriate size and would relate well to the pattern of development. It is well located in terms of local services and public transport routes. The landowner is committed to development of the site and it could be brought forward quickly.

Full text:

DLA Town Planning represents the owner of land at Goswell End Road in Harlington (Site NLP470). A Call for Sites submission was made in April 2016 and a detailed Planning Report was submitted as a follow-up. This Planning Report is attached to these representations for ease of reference.

In summary, this site is a highly suitable site for residential development. It would form a sensible extension to the village of Harlington, is bounded on two sides by Harlington Upper School, would be of an appropriate size and would relate well to the pattern of development. It is well located in terms of local services and public transport routes. The landowner is committed to development of the site and it could be brought forward quickly.

The Council's assessment of the site

We set out comments on the Council's assessment of site NLP470 below.

Question 1: Site Capacity
We have some concerns about the Council's methodology for estimating site capacity. We think it underestimates, substantially in some cases, the capacity of a site. We have put together an indicative scheme for around 30 dwellings and this is by no means a high-density scheme. When allocating sites the estimated capacity should be based on a site-specific assessment of capacity rather than generalised assumptions.

Question 6: Relationship to Settlement
The site is bounded to the west by Goswell End Road and the residential development fronting it. To the east is the buildings of Harlington Upper School (four storeys in height where it faces the site) and to the south is the school car park. The northern boundary is the only boundary with the countryside.
The Council's assessment of the site concluded that:

"The site is separated from Harlington by a road, however this road is not an A road and therefore does not present a major constraint. Extension of Harlington in this way would extend the settlement north into an area which is currently mostly undeveloped with the exception of the Upper School which lies outside of the existing settlement envelope."

These comments are not unexpected in that any extension of Harlington will be into land currently undeveloped and outside the settlement envelope. Nevertheless, Harlington has an important role to play in meeting housing need and almost any form of housing provision will need a change to Green Belt boundaries.

Question 14: Green Belt
The Council's approach to assessing Green Belt sites focuses on parcels that make only a weak, relatively weak or no contribution to Green Belt parcels. While this work is useful, it needs to be balanced against the wider need to accommodate housing in sustainable locations. Harlington is a sustainable location and, on this basis, site assessment work should focus on finding the most suitable, least harmful sites around Harlington. The site at Goswell End Road is eminently suitable for housing.

Question 15a: Green Belt - exceptional circumstances
In order to demonstrate exceptional circumstances, the Council requires that a settlement has all of the following merits:
* Adjoining settlement has at least 3 of the following key local services - convenience shop, lower school, middle school, upper school, village hall, GP surgery, post office, library (use settlement audit) - Harlington has a post office, a shop, a village hall, a lower school and an upper school. As such it benefits from 5 of the key local services and qualifies easily;
* Site makes a strong contribution to housing need (100 plus homes) within the Luton HMA - this is the only criterion that the site fails on. The site could accommodate around 30 homes but together with the adjacent sites more than 100 homes could be accommodated;
* Site is in or directly adjacent to a settlement that has a mainline rail station or direct assess (junction) to the strategic road network (A road or motorway) - Harlington has a mainline railway station and this site directly adjoins the village. As such it would qualify.

Leaving aside any concerns about the validity of this approach, the Goswell End Road site, when assessed alongside the adjoining sites should proceed to the next stage of assessment. Site NLP471 adjoins the western boundary of site NLP470 and was also submitted by DLA Town Planning. This site is of a similar size to NLP470. Adjoining NLP471 is site NLP303, which was judged capable of accommodating 99 dwellings by the Council's methodology. As a package of sites, NLP303, 470 and 471 would represent a sensible extension to Harlington.

However, it is not considered appropriate to rule out a suitable site simply because it isn't large enough. Site NLP470 could still make a useful contribution to housing need without impacting the wider function of the Green Belt.

As site NLP470 did not progress to the stage two assessment, we cannot comment further. However, having reviewed subsequent stages of the site assessment process, we are confident that no insurmountable issues would be raised so as to prevent allocation of the site. In particular, we are confident that the site can be viably developed and will be of significant interest to the development industry, that it has no deliverability issues and that it can be developed within 0-5 years.

Attachments:

Object

Site Assessment Forms (Housing)

Representation ID: 3702

Received: 29/08/2017

Respondent: Mr Paul Tuohy

Representation:

ALP117/ALP123/ALP181/NLP107/NLP303/NLP381
I object to the proposed development of these sites around Harlington for housing as they are all on green belt land. The green belt was established for a purpose, ie, to protect open space and farming land from development and to keep a "green belt" around towns. I do not think this should be set aside when there are non-green belt sites that could be developed.

Full text:

ALP117/ALP123/ALP181/NLP107/NLP303/NLP381
I object to the proposed development of these sites around Harlington for housing as they are all on green belt land. The green belt was established for a purpose, ie, to protect open space and farming land from development and to keep a "green belt" around towns. I do not think this should be set aside when there are non-green belt sites that could be developed.

Object

Site Assessment Forms (Housing)

Representation ID: 4372

Received: 29/08/2017

Respondent: Mr K Fine

Agent: DLA Town Planning Ltd

Representation:

See attached concerning land off Goswell End Road, Harlington

Full text:

DLA Town Planning represents the owner of land at Goswell End Road in Harlington (site NLP470). A Call for Sites submission was made in April 2016 and a detailed Planning Report was submitted as a follow-up. This Planning Report is attached to these representations for ease of reference.

In summary, too great a proportion of development is being directed to strategic sites. These sites are reliant on high-level infrastructure provision (unfunded in many cases) and will not deliver homes quickly. More development should be planned for around existing towns and villages to complement strategic sites.


Concerns with the Council's Strategy

Only high-level information has been included in Local Plan and this has limited the ability to respond in detail. However, a number of issues are apparent with the Council's strategy that will need to be addressed before the pre-submission stage.

The reliance on very large sites is apparent from the draft Local Plan. This makes the overall strategy vulnerable, particularly when these big sites need such large infrastructure investment, which cannot be guaranteed. We understand the proposed new town at Tempsford is reliant on both East-West Rail and a new north-south route for the A1. At this stage, neither pieces of infrastructure even have established routes, yet alone any guaranteed funding. To hang such a major part of the Local Plan strategy on such uncertain infrastructure is extremely risky. If one of the major sites fails for whatever reason that is a problem for the Local Plan as a whole and potentially opens the door for hostile planning applications for less sustainable sites.

Smaller sites, such as land off Goswell End Road, Harlington aren't reliant on the same level of infrastructure and as such need to be part of the portfolio of sites in the Local Plan.

Very little detail is included in the plan on delivery timescales. With so much emphasis on large sites that will have long lead-in times there are considerable doubts about how much development will actually be built within the plan period. The Council's experience at North Houghton Regis should prompt caution when it comes to delivery rates from strategic sites that are reliant on major infrastructure.

The Harlington scheme could start delivering homes almost immediately and be complete within 3 years.

It is right to concentrate a certain amount of development in larger, strategic sites. However, directing too great a proportion of development to such proposals makes the strategy vulnerable to delay and risks unplanned development. A greater proportion of development directed to suitable sites on the edge of towns and villages would make the strategy more robust in securing housing delivery over the plan period.

Harlington in particular represents a sustainable location for housing, given its services and facilities and the mainline railway station. It also falls squarely within the Luton Housing Market Area where housing need is most acute. This reflects the Council's findings in its Settlement Capacity Study which lists Harlington as one of five settlements in Area A with the highest capacity for growth. The Study goes on to specify that "Of these settlements both Flitwick and Harlington were found to have the highest capacity for new development."



Suggested changes
A smaller proportion of development should be directed to the proposed strategic sites in order to maximise the deliverability of the Local Plan. A greater proportion should be directed to the villages, with Harlington being a good example. The site off Goswell End Road should specifically be allocated as a suitable housing site.

Attachments:

Comment

Site Assessment Forms (Housing)

Representation ID: 4385

Received: 10/08/2017

Respondent: Prologis UK Ltd

Agent: David Lock Associates

Representation:

Sundon RFI - this should be referred to within the consultation document as a growth location. expect RFI to be removed from Green Belt and identified as a site allocation for the next stage.

Full text:

We are responding to this consultation on behalf of Prologis UK Ltd., which is promoting land under its control adjacent to Sundon Quarry for a rail freight interchange (Sundon RFI).

Against the backdrop of the Council's adopted Framework Plan (2015), the draft versions of the Development Strategy and before that the Joint Core Strategy, we are surprised that Sundon RFI is not specifically referred to within the consultation document as a potential growth location / site allocation to be removed from the Green Belt in the emerging Local Plan.

We do note, however, that the RFI is treated as an employment land commitment in the Luton Housing Market Area Growth Options Study and that the Council's site assessments of the RFI proposal demonstrate its strong performance.

We therefore fully expect the RFI to be removed from the Green Belt and identified as a site allocation in the forthcoming Pre-Submission version of the Plan, in accordance with the Council's adopted Framework Plan and the evidence base underpinning the emerging Local Plan.

Finally, we express strong support for the early delivery of the M1-A6 Link Road, to which we expect the RFI to make a proportionate financial contribution.
We look forward to continuing to work with the Council in delivering this long planned RFI.

Attachments:

Comment

Site Assessment Forms (Housing)

Representation ID: 4513

Received: 03/08/2017

Respondent: Harlington Parish Council

Representation:

Please see attachment for detailed comments on:

Loss of character to the village
Lack of services and facilities within Harlington
Infrastructure cannot support further development
Loss of Green Belt

Full text:

See attachment for comments from Harlington Parish Council

Attachments:

Object

Site Assessment Forms (Housing)

Representation ID: 4656

Received: 20/08/2017

Respondent: Mr David Blakeman

Representation:

Assessments is inaccurate, ALP117 and NLP381 will cause coalescence.
Railway line forms a barrier to stop unsustainable development.
ALP117/NLP381 would create ribbon development from Harlington to M1 junction.
ALP117/NLP381 would lead to loss of green wedge between Harlington and A5120 roundabout causing coalescence.
ALP117/NLP381 would leave only a small wedge of land between Harlington and Westoning.
Scale of development would destroy village character.
Pressure on services.
Inaccuracy on assessment services only corner shop, small café, hairdressers and gunsmiths.
Unnecessary elimination of green belt.
Transport
Sustainability
Drainage issues

Full text:

I am strongly objecting.
The attached case studies contain clear errors in methodology and conclusions. In particular, the case studies state, in answer to question 7 of the site assessments, that there are "no coalescence issues". This response is clearly inaccurate in the case of sites ALP117 and NLP381 and is, at best, misleading and, at worst, inaccurate, so far as concerns the other sites selected to move forwards as part of the plan process.
Sites NLP381 and ALP117 are very large sites. They stand to the west of the railway line and breach the protective line that the line creates in terms of creating unsustainable "orphan" development to the west of the existing settlement. In terms of coalescence, it clearly creates ribbon development running from the western end of the proposed site, (which abuts the roundabout on Harlington Road (at the junction with the A5120)) , past Poplars Garden Centre, and the M1 junction which abiuts Poplars. To state more simply, there would be development running from the M1 junction all the way up to Harlington. The existing green wedge, dividing Harlington from the development commencing at the A5120 roundabout would be eliminating, thus causing coalescence with the developed area running from the M1 junction. Furthermore, the proposed developments leave only a very small wedge of land dividing Harlington from Westoning.
Even worse, however, the colossal scale of development (doubling or even trebling the existing population of the village) that would result were the various non-excluded sites also to be developed would destroy the character of the village and would completely overwhelm the services available in the village (the site assessments fail to identify the services accurately-but which merely consist of a corner shop, a small cafe, a hairdressers and a gunsmith!).

In short, simply on coalescence issues, the site assessments fail in terms of methodology and conclusion. There are many other concerns, alluded to, obliquely, in this comment (but including also unnecessary elimination of the green belt, transport, sustainablilty andndrainage ssues), that are of major concern, but coalescence is an obvious issue that has clearly not been dealt with properly.

Object

Site Assessment Forms (Housing)

Representation ID: 5278

Received: 18/09/2017

Respondent: Mr & Mrs Caldwell

Representation:

Object to ALP181/NLP107 Harlington
Due to poor access to the site, the fields flood, not many shops, nearly full school, sewerage and water supply problems, destroy the countryside.

Full text:

Object to ALP181/NLP107 Harlington
Due to poor access to the site, the fields flood, not many shops, nearly full school, sewerage and water supply problems, destroy the countryside.

Attachments:

Comment

Site Assessment Forms (Housing)

Representation ID: 5482

Received: 29/08/2017

Respondent: Landowners & IM Properties

Agent: Barton Willmore

Representation:

Old Park Farm - Harlington

Full text:

See attachment

Attachments:

Comment

Site Assessment Forms (Housing)

Representation ID: 5599

Received: 24/08/2017

Respondent: MLN Land & Properties Ltd

Agent: GVA

Representation:

NLP107

Largely in agreement with assessment
See attachment for detailed comments from site promoter re: intention to develop site, strength of green belt, physical constraints and adjoining uses, agricultural land quality, landscape character, open space/leisure and GI assets

Full text:

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Object

Site Assessment Forms (Housing)

Representation ID: 6865

Received: 22/07/2017

Respondent: Judith Broadbent

Representation:

Greenbelt (imperative to protect); wildlife (natural haven); traffic (dangerous); water pressure (weak already); flooding (standing water)
If development essential: better option would be between railway and motorway

Full text:

ALP181/NLP107
Harlington, land west of Sundon Road

I am objecting to any potential development of this site on a number of grounds.
Greenbelt: This site must be protected. It is designated as greenbelt for a reason, and building houses does not constitute the 'very special circumstances' required to justify overriding this protection. Our greenbelt is precious, important, and irreplaceable. It really matters.
Wildlife: There are barn owls, yellowhammers, fieldfares, green and greater-spotted woodpeckers, bullfinches, deer, foxes and all manner of other wildlife living in or using this site, and a wealth of meadow flowers - it is a real natural sanctuary which once lost would be lost for ever. It leads unbroken to the Sundon Hills and is undoubtedly an area of absolute beauty.
Traffic: Harlington is not equipped for vehicle increase. The crossroads at the junction with Station Road is very difficult to navigate. The road that winds around the church has zero visibility, is narrow and is not even designed for the volume of cars we have now. Sundon Road as it drops down to this site has a bend on the hill followed by single file past parked cars which requires extreme care. There is no safe access to this site, and residential Pilgrims Close would not be able to cope with the inevitable increase to 200 or 300 cars plus delivery vans, refuse vehicles etc.
Water pressure: Pilgrims Close and adjoining roads already suffer from low water pressure and additional demand would be too much strain.
Flooding: This site has standing water for much of the year, despite new drainage.
If it is incumbent upon Harlington to accept additional housing, the parcel of land to the west of the railway line would be much more acceptable. Building between the railway and the motorway would protect the character of the village, be less invasive, and would avoid the traffic problems outlined above.

Comment

Site Assessment Forms (Housing)

Representation ID: 7141

Received: 29/08/2017

Respondent: Denison Investments

Agent: Arrow Planning

Representation:

Denison Investments Limited are the promoters of the following sites
within Central Bedfordshire:
* Land off Goswell End Road, Harlington (CBC Ref
NLP303/ALP123);
* Alma Farm, Toddington (CBC Ref NLP411);
* Land at Warren Farm Phase 2, Ampthill (CBC Ref
NLP412/ALP343);
* One-O-One Field, Ampthill Road, Flitwick (CBC Ref
NLP397/ALP345);
* Land at Leighton Road, Hockliffe (CBC Ref NLP413/ALP125);
* Land to the North of Shefford Road, Clifton (CBC Ref NLP361).

Full text:

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Attachments: